Is the .Com Overrated

Is the .Com Overrated

When it comes to domain name extensions, most people are familiar with .com. Because of this the average webmaster is scrambling to get the perfect .com domain name. Some may even forego registering a potential goldmine of a domain name in favor of getting a less popular .com. Yet, there are dozens of other domain names available, some of which have gained popularity despite not being a .com. How can a webmaster determine if their site is going to be in such a league without the traditional .com, This article will explain how.

First, a webmaster needs to evaluate the purpose of their website. If their website is designed to simply direct people to an affiliate page, then it won’t really matter what extension it has, since they are only going to visit it once anyway. However, if a website is designed for repeat visits, people may not care about the site not having a .com. Sites that contain updated information, games and message boards tend to be the type of sites that get repeat visitors.

Secondly, webmasters need to consider the memorable nature of their domain name. If a webmaster is able to create a witty domain name hack, such as del.icio.us, and their content is good, it may not matter that they don’t have a .com. A good site that can allow a webmaster to register unconventional domain name extensions is New.net. This site offers extensions such as .love and .free. By looking at these extensions, webmasters can start pondering ideas for their own domain name hacks. If they need help, they can always type the word or letters used in the extension in a keyword analyzer or search engine.

Thirdly, webmasters need to determine whether or not a domain name with an unconventional extension will rank higher in search engines than a domain name with a traditional one. In fact, consider the above-mentioned example of del.icio.us. Honestly, how many people are typing such a domain name in their browser, While it is certainly memorable, all of the periods associated with it are annoying. Yet, the site still has a high search engine ranking, which is probably how it’s getting its traffic.

Surfers visit it from the search engine, bookmark it and never again have to be associated with its unique URL. This is the type of success a webmaster wants to emulate. Indeed, if a domain name is keyword-rich and memorable, webmasters need to definitely go for whatever extension is available for it.

Of course, this is not to say that a person must be limited to just domain name. If they want to still use .coms after using other extensions they can. In fact, the more domain names that point to a site, the more likely a search engine bot will index it higher. So, ultimately, with this strategy, webmasters will have two domain names they can work with. They can use the one with the unconventional domain name in search engine marketing in hopes of getting indexed high, while the other one can be used in printed media, where people are more likely to be concerned with the type of URL they are entering in their browser.

Avoiding Trademark Infringement When Choosing a Domain Name

Avoiding Trademark Infringement When Choosing a Domain Name

Many webmasters erroneously believe that just because their domain name registrar says a particular domain name is ‘available’ that it truly is. This is not necessarily so. Even if a domain name is physically available, it may not legally be open for use. Why, It’s because there might already be a company that has the rights to the keywords used within the domain name.

If this happens yet the webmaster claims the domain name anyway, they are at risk of losing it through a domain name arbitration proceeding. They could even be charged with trademark/copyright infringement if things get really ugly. For this reason it’s best to make sure the keywords used in a domain name aren’t protected for someone else. This article will explain how webmasters can make such a determination.

First, webmasters need to check and see if their chosen domain name resembles any existing trademark that is on the books. They will want to do this before actually investing any money in the domain name. To search existing trademarks, webmasters can visit the website of the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office which is USPTO.gov. From here they can search a database that contains current trademarks as well as those that are pending.

If a domain name is similar to a registered or pending trademark, webmasters need to evaluate whether the domain name is still worth taking. Usually, if a site is not selling the same types of merchandise or services that the other business is selling and the trademark is not popular, a webmaster probably won’t get into legal trouble if they decide to go on and register the domain name. To be completely sure, webmasters can run the domain name by a trademark attorney. It shouldn’t cost too much for an hour consultation.

Of course, if a webmaster would prefer zero percent risk, they can simply try to think of another domain name. When they go about doing this, they need to be more generic and less creative in what they come up with. Using search engine keywords for a domain name is one such strategy. Webmasters can also look into using dictionary terms. If all else fails they can take a generic term and combine it with a term that is less likely to be taken, such as their first and last name.

Either way, once a suitable domain name has been chosen, webmasters should consider getting it trademarked themselves, especially if they are using it to help brand their business. With an official trademark, a webmaster has more legal power should another company try to take them to court. And since there’s no shortage of domain name bullies, (companies that try to steal profitable domain names from smaller enterprises), a webmaster should use all legal avenues available to protect the rights of their business.

In conclusion, by checking whether or not a domain name has keywords that are part of a trademark, webmasters lessen the risk that they will have legal problems in the future. If there are problems, and a domain name arbitration proceeding does not rule in a webmaster’s favor, they can turn to The Domain Name Rights Coalition.

Cheap Domain Names

Cheap Domain Names

In order for people to access a website, they must first enter in its associated domain name. This is a word or phrase that denotes the name of the site and/or summarizes what it is about. Even free web hosting companies offer domain names, but there’s an essential difference. With free web hosting companies, the domain names offered are in the form of third level domain names.

This means their domain name must be included when a person is trying to access the third level domain. The only problem with this is that it makes a domain name long and hard to remember. For this reason it’s best if a person considers just buying their own domain name. And with the availability of cheap domain names, it is possible to get one that is very affordable.

Cheap domain names can range from being completely free to around $6.95. Usually free domain names that are worth anything are included with a web hosting package. So, a customer is technically still paying a fee. The other types of domain names that require a fee can be purchased separately without a web hosting package. The prices for these start at $1.00 and go up from there.

When a person purchases a cheap domain name, the overall registration process is the same as it would be for regularly-priced domains. This means that first they would have to see if their domain name is available. To do this they must enter in their desired domain name in a special text box, then select the extension they want. If the domain name is available, they are free to purchase it. If it is not available, they will have to choose another domain name. Cheap domain name companies will offer suggestions on alternative domain names when this scenario occurs.

Are there any downsides to using cheap domain names, Unfortunately, yes. If a cheap domain name company is unscrupulous, a person may never receive a domain name at all. What happens is the company tells the customer to wait a few days for the domain name to become active. However, at the end of the timeframe, the domain name still doesn’t work. And since the company is unscrupulous anyway, emailing customer service won’t do anything.

How can a person ensure they don’t encounter a fraudulent cheap domain name company, First and foremost they need to check to see if it is registered with the Better Business Bureau. This is an organization that ensures businesses are operating in a legitimate manner. Secondly, they need to see if the company has normal contact information, such as an address and a telephone number. Thirdly, they should see if the company has a bad reputation on message board dedicated to webmasters. Of course, one may not always get an opinion on a particular company but if they do they will know to stay clear of it.

Yet, if a cheap domain name company is legitimate, there is no other disadvantage to getting a discounted domain name. They work just like regularly priced domain names, so if a person has one available to them they definitely need to take advantage of it.

Choosing the Right Domain Name

Choosing the Right Domain Name

Domain names are to websites as book covers are to novels. If they are not interesting enough, or don’t properly convey what a website is about, visitor will have no desire to enter them in their browsers. Yet, excessive creativity doesn’t make for a good domain name either. Why is this so, It’s because if a domain name is creative but not keyword-rich, search engine bots won’t be able to index it in search engine listings. So, ultimately, your domain name must be both catchy yet search engine optimized. This article will explain how you can achieve both objectives.

First and foremost you will need to find a popular search engine keyword that can be incorporated into your domain name. A keyword analyzer can help you in this task. These can be found pretty easily with a basic search engine query. When you find one, enter in a keyword that best summarizes the purpose of your website. The keyword analyzer will return different versions of this keyword. If the more specific instances can also fit within the nature of your website, choose one. This is because when it comes to search engine optimization, more specific keywords are better since they are less likely to be used by other webmasters.

Now you can start selecting your actual domain name. Most domain name companies will allow you to see whether or not your domain name is available. If it is not available, it will return a list of recommended domain names. Take advantage of this tool by first entering your selected keyword. If your keyword as a domain name is not available, consider the suggestions the domain name company gives. If the main keyword is still included in these suggestions and it ends with .com, consider it. Otherwise, you will have to be more creative.

For example, you can use ‘filler’ words, numbers or phrases within your domain name to still include your selected keyword. Fillers could be ‘a,’ ‘an’ or ‘the.’ Search engines tend to not look at these words, so you still have a good shot at getting indexed while having a domain name that is memorable and catchy. You can also consider fillers at the end of a phrase, such as ‘101’.

What if you do these things and you still can’t get .com, Well, there are some situations where it is better to stick with a lesser-used extension because the keyword is just that popular. Extensions that still get noticed include .net, .biz and .org. Additionally, you can also consider using country or state-based extensions if you don’t mind international or local-based marketing. It’s better to be number 1 in France’s version of Google than to be number 200 or worse in America’s version of Google.

In conclusion, choosing a domain name that will get the right buzz from both humans and search engines doesn’t have to be hard. The keyword analyzer will help you with 90% of your domain name, while your wit with fillers can help you the other 10%. And, if after an immense amount of pondering, you still can’t get the .com, you can opt for other extensions.

Domain Name Arbitration

Domain Name Arbitration

After several minutes of pondering and looking at keyword analyzers, you find the perfect domain name for your new website. You see if it is available through your desired domain name company. When you find that it is, you get excited because it seems that it is going to be quite profitable for your site. So, you sign up for it, thinking that it is up for grabs, since your domain name company has said it is available.

Then after a few months you get correspondence from an attorney saying that your new domain name has violated another company’s trademark. You are now stuck with a potential legal battle that could cause you to lose your domain name, your reputation and maybe even worse. Fortunately, with domain name arbitration, there’s a chance you can get out of such a situation and avoid any possible legal consequences.

What is domain name arbitration, It is a process in which the complainant and the original holder of the domain name try to work out a reasonable agreement as to who actually has the rights to the domain name in question. The arbitration in itself is done through the Uniform Domain Name Dispute Resolution Policy, (also known as UDRP). This is a special arbitration method set forth by the ICANN (Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers) organization. It is used for most domain name disputes, because it is cheaper and less time-consuming than ‘traditional’ litigation.

In order to initiate a domain name arbitration proceeding, a webmaster must go through a provider that has been approved by ICANN to handle such disputes. Once the arbitration begins, the provider will first determine if the complainant has merit in their claim. They will do this by evaluating whether the domain name in question is similar to a trademark or domain name set forth by the claimant.

They will then determine what rights the claimant has to the title along with whether or not the domain was chosen accidentally or with the intention of taking advantage of the claimant’s brand popularity. If it is found the domain name was chosen in bad faith, rights to it will be granted to the claimant. Otherwise, the original owner will retain possession of the disputed domain name.

If either party is not satisfied with a domain name arbitration proceeding, they can challenge the findings in a regular courtroom. An example of this happened with Robert De Niro, when he tried to claim the rights to any domain name containing the phrase ‘Tribeca.’ He is still in court trying to retain the rights to Tribeca.net, which has been claimed by another person.

In conclusion, domain name arbitration is a great alternative to avoiding taking a domain name dispute into a courtroom, at least initially. There is the option to go to court if either side feels an arbitration isn’t fair. Yet, for most webmasters, the decisions made by the UDRP panel are good enough for them, since getting their consul is a lot cheaper than going to a judge.