Making Money Selling Domain Names

Making Money Selling Domain Names

Selling domain names can be quite profitable for webmasters. This is particularly the case if the webmaster sells a domain name that has an existing line of traffic. In these situations domain names can generate thousands of dollars for their webmasters. There have even been domain name names that allowed webmasters to collect millions in profit. With a little bit of basic knowledge, you can emulate such success for yourself. This article will provide that information through an easy to follow step-by-step guide.

First, you will need to find a search engine keyword that is highly searched yet not used much by other websites. You can do this by using a keyword analyzer. The best keyword analyzers are those that you pay for, such as Word Tracker or Keyword Analyzer. The reason why these are preferable over free ones is because they let you know how much competition you are facing with a potential keyword. Free ones only tell you how much the keyword has been searched. If money is a problem, try to get a paid keyword analyzer that is offering a free sample, such as Word Tracker. You can upgrade to the paid version once you return profit from the sale of your domain name.

With your keyword chosen, you will need to get a domain name and web hosting. Why do you need web hosting if you’re going to sell just the domain name, It’s because you’re going to need a website to drive traffic to that domain name. Without a website visitors won’t want to return to whatever domain name you selected. This lessens the main element that gives a domain name profitability: traffic.

Anyway, try to get a package that will include both web hosting and a domain name at the same time, since you won’t have to worry about transferring anything later. When you choose your domain name, make sure you include your selected keyword in its phrasing. If you find that your selected keyword is taken as a domain name, try making alterations like saying “a1”, “123” or “101.” For example, say the keyword “Careers” is taken as a domain name. You could say “A1 Careers,” “Careers 123” or “Careers 101.” Alternatively, you could try searching for a related keyword that isn’t taken as a domain name. Either way, keep trying until you get a memorable yet keyword-rich domain name that still has a .com extension.

Now, you will need to create a website for your domain name. It doesn’t have to be big… even a one-pager could do the trick, if you don’t mind a website so simple. Write an article related to the keyword you chose and create a simple site using Microsoft Word, (make sure you save the document as an .HTML file). Sign up for Adsense and/or an affiliate program, so you can offer additional resources for your visitors. You will also earn a commission if a sale is made or a clickthrough generated, (depending on the program you joined).

Once your website is uploaded, you need to focus on traffic-building. You can get an initial boost by buying traffic, though make sure the company you buy your traffic from uses expired domain names rather than bots or even incentive traffic, (such as paid emails). But even after this you will need to try to build up inbound links. These are websites that link to you. Post your site on any free site, such as directories, message boards or online classified ads. Also, make sure you submit articles to free article directories. Additionally, try to initiate link exchanges. You can do this by emailing the webmaster or finding link exchange networks such as Link Market.

Keep building up your links until you get a steady stream of traffic. If you get enough traffic, you will get an Alexa rating. If the rating is pleasing, find a domain name appraiser and see how much your domain name can go for. This will give you some idea of how much you can realistically get, but don’t get discouraged if the number seems low. Why, It’s because some people will care more about the traffic your domain name is receiving over the supposed SEO elements of it.

Either way, when you feel you are ready put your domain name up for auction. You may even want to include your original website, though this is optional. When the domain name sells, you will need to transfer it over to the new webmaster’s account… your web hosting company can help you with this.

With your profit you may want to consider doing the venture again with an expired domain name. This will get you a traffic boost without having to go through the actual process of traffic-building, (if you decide you don’t want to do that).

Hyphenated Domain Names

Hyphenated Domain Names

You think of a perfect domain name. It contains a keyword that is found in search engines, has no trademark issues and is memorable for website visitors. You try to register your domain name with a domain name company. It appears to be taken. So, you put a hyphen in it. That version of your domain name is not taken, but should you go on and invest in it, This article will explore what webmasters need to consider if they are deciding to use hyphenated domain names.

First, they need to think about their website visitors. Most people are not accustomed to using hyphenated domain names. Even if they like a website, it may be simply a matter of forgetting to include the hyphen. If this happens then the unhyphenated version of the domain name will be what receives traffic, which is definitely not what a webmaster wants. Of course, if a domain name is not hyphenated in the first place, then such an issue would never arise.

However, a hyphenated domain name that is keyword-rich has a higher chance of getting a good ranking from a search engine than a non-hyphenated domain that is not SEO optimized. A higher search engine ranking might outweigh the initial disadvantage of how inconvenient a hyphenated domain name is. This is because if a website has a high search engine ranking, people won’t need to type in the domain name in order to access it. They can simply click on the listing given in search engine results. And if they like the site, they will bookmark it, an action that is preferable, since it shows they are really interested in what the site has to offer.

Webmasters should also consider whether or not their domain name is more understandable if they use a hyphen. Consider the unusual domain name molestationnursery.com. This is actually in reference to a website that talks about mole nurseries, not molestation. Yet, what will most website visitors think if they saw the domain name in that manner, Including hyphens can make such a website much clearer.

It would also be better for SEO, since search engines would index mole-station-nursery.com with keywords related to moles.

So, basically, there are advantages and disadvantages to using hyphenated domain names. If a webmaster thinks their domain name is going to bring them a lot of search engine traffic, they should go for it. And in some cases, a hyphenated domain name is necessary to make its meaning easier to understand.

Otherwise, webmasters should try their best to create non-hyphenated domain names, since these are the types of domain names that rule the Internet world. If they are having trouble coming up with a better domain name, they can consider using a domain name generator. Many domain name companies provide rudimentary domain name generators if a selected domain name gets turned down. Webmasters don’t have to settle for these type though, since there are more sophisticated domain name generators that can offer even more suggestions.

Get Traffic with Expired Domain Names

Get Traffic with Expired Domain Names

One of the greatest difficulties in being a new webmaster is trying to acquire traffic. This is because trying to build legitimate traffic requires both time and money. How is this so, Well, if a webmaster is trying to obtain traffic through search engines, they will need to spend a great deal of time with link-building and content creation.

If they are trying to get traffic through a pay-per-click program, they will have to invest hundreds to thousands of dollars if they want to take advantage of a high-performance keyword. However, there is another alternative that can allow a webmaster to get tons of traffic without having to invest too much in time or money. It involves purchasing expired domain names.

What is an expired domain name, An expired domain name is a domain name that never got renewed by its owner. This could be for a variety of reasons such as disinterest in the original website, lack of funds or something more serious, such as an owner’s death. Whatever the reason when the renewal fees aren’t paid, the expired domain name sits out in cyberspace still functioning as any other domain name. There is just one difference… an expired domain name doesn’t have a website attached to it, so it instead points to a 404 error page.

Indeed, it is a waste of traffic when an expired domain name points to a 404 web page. Many domain name companies have realized this, which is why quite a few sell expired domain names either through a regular, upfront sale or through an expired domain name auction. The prices for these domain names can range from less than $100 to over $1 million. Some of these sales may even include a website.

So, how does a webmaster know if an expired domain name is worth buying, First, they need to check to see the Google page rank of an expired domain name. To do this they need to download Google’s toolbar and then type in the URL of the expired domain name. The toolbar will then let them know what the page rank is. If the page rank indicator is gray, the expired domain name must be avoided since this means the site has been banned by Google. Otherwise, it should be okay, though webmasters should also take into consideration the actual number associated with the page rank. If the number is between 6 and 10, they should strongly consider buying the expired domain name.

Secondly, webmasters need to find out the Alexa rating of an expired domain name. The Alexa rating determines how much traffic has actually gone to a domain name. If a website has not received a significant amount of traffic, it will not have an Alexa rating. To determine the Alexa rating for an expired domain name, webmasters need to visit Alexa.com.

Finally, webmasters need to see how many websites are linking to the expired domain name. To do this they need to put the command link: followed by the URL of the expired domain name into a search engine. If a lot of links are returned, this is a sign that the traffic coming to the expired domain name originated from legitimate sources.

Misspelled Domain Names

Misspelled Domain Names

When it comes to search engine keywords, there are some that are potential gold mines that are being ignored. These are ones in which a word or phrase is accidentally misspelled. Usually, the search engine will link to results that contain the correct spelling, but it will still show any websites associated with the misspelled keyword. If one of these websites catches the eye of a surfer, they may visit it. This is why many webmasters will not only create websites around misspelled keywords but also pay money to bid on them in pay-per-click search engine advertisements.

But misspelled keywords can help in another venue of Internet marketing… one’s domain name. When a popular misspelled keyword is included in a domain name, the search engine bots will be more likely to notice the website. Granted, it won’t get listed with the properly spelled keyword, but even traffic from a misspelled keyword is better than nothing. A person will just have to decide whether they want their website to be branded with a domain name that has an improper spelling.

So, how exactly can a webmaster make such a determination when they are deciding on their domain name, Well, first they need to look at what their website is for. If they are just doing affiliate marketing or Adsense promotion, it doesn’t matter as much if their domain name is branded properly. This is because they are not promoting their own Web business. However, if they are using a website to promote a company, they will want to try to keep their domain name as professional as possible.

Secondly, a webmaster needs to see if there is profitability in a misspelled keyword. Even though a misspelled domain isn’t as harmful to a webmaster promoting affiliate sites, they don’t necessarily want to make it a first option, especially if the misspelled keyword in the domain name doesn’t get much traffic. To determine a misspelled keyword’s profitability, a person can look it up in a keyword analyzer. In fact, some paid keyword analyzers, (such as Word Tracker), even have features where a person can see which specific types of misspelled keywords are worth taking advantage of.

If a misspelled keyword fits both of these criteria, a webmaster may want to consider putting it in their domain name. From there they will need to decide if they want that keyword to be included in the content. If it is then there’s an even greater likelihood search engine bots will index the website according to the misspelled keyword. However, if it’s not there’s still a chance that the website could be indexed according to the correct keyword, though if this ranking is low, it may not be a preferable option.

The webmaster will ultimately have to decide whether their content still looks ‘professional’ with the misspelled keyword. Some words, (such as mesothelioma), are so hard to spell, that a person may not even notice improper versions of it. If this happens they won’t have any issues seeing it so many times in the content, since they didn’t really know how to spell it right themselves.

In conclusion, including a misspelled keyword in one’s domain name could be an excellent way to covertly get website traffic, at least if a webmaster knows what he or she is doing. If they don’t a misspelled domain name could cause a person to think negatively about a website.

For this reason webmasters must take caution in which misspelled keywords they choose for their domain names along with whether or not they continue to use it in their content.

Internationalized Domain Names and Homograph Attacks

Internationalized Domain Names and Homograph Attacks

With normal spoofing a scammer tries to get personal information by sending fraudulent emails masquerading as an official website an individual might be working with. While some fall for the deception, many know better since the domain name in the email doesn’t resemble the domain name they usually use to access whatever site. However, what happens if a domain name looks exactly like an official website,

This, in combination with a more ‘professional’ email, could trick someone into giving away all of their personal data. And when this happens they will eventually become victims of identity theft. But, how can a scammer acquire a domain name that looks official, It’s through the unfortunate practice of the homograph attack.

What is a homograph attack, A homograph attack is when a person makes an internationalized domain name, (also known as an IDN), look like a traditional domain name associated with a popular website. They are able to do this because of the way internationalized domain names work. Basically, internationalized domain systems use a different type of coding system than the ASCII-based domain names Americans are used to.

However, even with a different coding system, some languages have characters that look similar to characters used in American English. Scammers exploit this by taking these letters and creating domain names that look ‘new’ to browsers and servers, at least in terms of coding. To the human eye, these fraudulent domain names appear to already be taken, which is exactly what a scammer wants. They cause further confusion by creating sites that look pretty much like the sites associated with the original domain name that the scammers are spoofing.

Before and even after internationalized domain names became popular, homograph attacks were expressed through spoofing just English characters. Scammers exploited the visual similarities between ‘O’ and ‘0’ or ‘I’ and ‘l’. Examples include ‘G00Gle.com or ‘PayPaI.com.’ If a person is not paying attention, they could still become victims, but at least these types of domain names still look unusual. With internationalized domain name homograph attacks, the above-mentioned websites could look just as they are supposed to, fooling even the most vigilant Internet user.

So, how can a person prevent becoming a victim of an internationalized domain name homograph attack, First, they should never click on any domain name that is given through an email. Instead, they should enter the domain name manually into their browser. In situations where one is working with a third-level domain that could be harder to remember, Internet users need to copy and paste the domain name into Notepad. This program will help them determine what character set and coding is being used for the domain name. If it’s not English and ASCII, a person should be weary.

In conclusion, internationalized domain name homograph attacks can cause a lot of havoc for Internet users. However, Internet users should find comfort in the fact that while they do need to be aware of the presence of the homograph attack, the traditional method of spoofing which is much easier to spot tends to be more common. This is because a person must be both clever and lucky to land an internationalized domain name that looks that much like a domain name that is already in use. It’s much easier for scammers to try and fool people through email hyperlinks.

Domain Name Hacks

Domain Name Hacks

Traditional domain names consist of a word or phrase that describes a website followed by an extension. Extensions can be .com, .net or country-based such as .fr or .jp. So, if this is the case, how can domain names like blo.gs or del.icio.us exist, It’s because a domain name doesn’t have to follow a traditional format. When it is created in the manner demonstrated above, it is called a domain name hack. With a domain name hack, a domain name spells out a ‘word’ by using a combination of periods and less popular country-based or state-based extensions.

Now, if you think a domain name hack is a simply a trick created by spammers and/or webmasters with no life, think again. Yahoo obtained the rights to both blo.gs and del.icio.us, despite their unusual-looking format. There are also popular organizations that are actually known by domain name hacks. Examples include who.is, (a site that lets a webmaster know the specifics behind a domain name and their associated website), and whocalled.us, (a site that allows consumers to list the numbers of telemarketers). Even other countries use domain name hacks in their own languages. Consider Germany’s popular Schokola.de, (which means chocolate in English).

So, does this mean webmasters should consider using domain name hacks, The answer is it depends. It is important to remember that while domain name hacks are witty, many of them can be inconvenient for web surfers. Some may even wonder if the site is legitimate, since the most common extensions are .com, .net, .org and .biz. However, since there are domain name hacks that still receive a healthy amount of traffic, it is possible that website visitors might overlook how a domain name hack is titled if the site it is pointing to proves to be worthwhile. There is also the option of having a second more normal-looking domain name point to a domain name hack. This gives website visitors two ways of being able to access one’s website.

How can a person think of a good domain name hack, First, they need to get a list of all the extensions that are possible with a domain name. They then need to find a domain name company that sells that sells the extension they are looking for. Then they will need to think of any word or phrase that includes the letters used in the extension. But they will need to make sure these letters are at the end of the word, since extensions conclude a domain name. An exception could be made if a person considers using third-level domains. In this situation the letters of the extension could be used in the middle of the domain name hack.

If a webmaster finds they are having trouble thinking of a word or phrase that contains their selected extension, they could use a keyword analyzer to help them. Overture and Google offer keyword analyzers for free, though webmasters might find more use from paid keyword analyzers. This is because paid keyword analyzers offer more information about a keyword than free ones.